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25 Innovative Computer Science Professors

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Charles W. Anderson - Colorado State University

Charles W. Anderson is a professor of computer science at Colorado State University, where he also teaches in the school of biomedical engineering; graduate degree program in ecology; and molecular, cellular and integrative neurosciences program. His machine learning research focuses on reinforcement learning, EEG pattern recognition, and neural networks.

Yashwant K. Malaiya - Colorado State University

Yashwant K. Malaia is a professor within the computer science department at Colorado State University. Major topics on which he focuses include discovery process modeling, security vulnerabilities, and software and hardware testing, amongst others.

Alfred V. Aho - Columbia University

As the Lawrence Gussman Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University, Alred V. Aho focuses his research interests on programming languages, compilers, algorithms, software engineering, and quantum computing. He is the co-holder of the patent for “Detecting and Preventing Malcode Execution,” and has been an invited speaker to numerous talks since 2010.

Steven M. Bellovin - Columbia University

Steven M. Bellovin is a professor of computer science at Columbia University, where his research interests include networks, security, privacy, and others. He is the co-chair of the 2008 Applied Cryptography and Network Security conference, and since September 2012 he has worked as the Chief Technologist for the Federal Trade Commission.

M. Brian Blake - Drexel University

M. Brian Blake is a distinguished professor of systems and software engineering at Drexel University, where he also serves as the executive vice president for academic affairs and provost. He has received numerous grant awards, including the GAAAN Fellowships in Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Notre Dame II, and is a senior member of IEEE, with which he also acts as editor in various capacities for a number of publications.

Boaz Barak - Harvard University

Boaz Barak is the Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science at Harvard University, and, until January 2016, has served as a principal researcher in Microsoft Research New England. He was also named in Foreign Policy magazine’s list of 100 leading global thinkers for 2014, and has received numerous awards, including the Packard Foundation Fellowship and the Sloan Foundation Fellowship, both in 2007.

Simona Doboli - Hofstra University

Simona Doboli is a professor of computer science at Hofstra University, where her research areas include neural models for individual and group brainstorming, model extraction for trained neural networks, among others. She is the associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks Journal, and engages in a number of other independent studies, including one involving swarm intelligence.

Gregory D. Hager - Johns Hopkins University

Gregory D. Hager is the Mandell Bellmore Professor of Computer Science at Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include computer vision, robotics, medical robotics, and human-machine systems, and he is the director of the Computational Interaction and Robotics Lab in the Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics.

Yair Amir - Johns Hopkins University

Yair Amir is a professor of computer science Johns Hopkins University, where he also serves as the department chair. He co-founded Spread Concepts LLC in 2000 and LTN Global Communications in 2008, and his research interests include algorithms, networks, and systems.

Eunice Santos - Illinois Institute of Technology

Eunice Santos is the Hochsprung Endowed Chair and professor of computer science at the Illinois Institute of Technology. She has served as a senior research fellow at the U.S. Department of Defense’s Center for Technology and National Security Policy, and has received a host of awards, namely the NSF CAREER Award and the Robinson Faculty Award.

Bella Bose - Oregon State University

Bella Bose is a professor of computer science at Oregon State University. He is a fellow with the Association for Computing Machinery and IEEE, and his recent work has “broken new grounds in codes for flash memory which would reduce the error rate and increase storage capacity.”

Meng Su - Penn State Behrend

Meng Su is an associate professor and department chair of computer science and software engineering at Penn State Behrend, where he joined the faculty in 2000. He is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery and the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence.

Naseem Ibrahim - Penn State Behrend

Naseem Ibrahim is an assistant professor of computer science and software engineering at Penn State Behrend. His research interests include cloud computing and formal specifications, among other areas, and he has helped author over 20 publications since 2008.

Richard L. Blumenthal - Regis University

Richard L. Blumenthal is a professor of computer science at Regis University, where he also serves as the program coordinator for the bachelors of science program in computer science. He is a senior member of the association for computing machinery, and has authored and co-authored a wide array of publications.

Serafim Batzoglou - Stanford University

Serafim Batzoglou is a professor of computer science at Stanford University. He is a recipient of the Sloan Fellowship and the NSF CAREER Award, and he was named in Technology Review’s “Top 100 Young Technology Innovators” in 2003. In addition, he co-founded DNAnexus.

Dirk Grunwald - University of Colorado

Dirk Grunwald is a professor and the director of undergraduate studies and associate chair of the computer science department at the University of Colorado, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1989. He has authored a number of publications, including the recently published “How New Technologies Can Turn a Spectrum Crisis Into a Spectrum Opportunity.”

James H. Martin - University of Colorado

As a professor of computer science at the University of Colorado, James H. Martin focuses his research on “getting computers to perform interesting and useful tasks involving human language.” He is a fellow with the Institute of Cognitive Science at CU Boulder, and has authored a number of publications related to artificial intelligence, cognitive science, and computational linguistics.

Gregory Donohoe - University of Idaho

Gregory Donohoe is a professor computer science at the University of Idaho. He has over 30 years of experience in research and development in the field of computer science, and has acted as a deputy research program manager at the Air Force Research Laboratory, as well as a senior scientist at Kestrel Corporation.

Jim Alves-Foss - University of Idaho

Jim Alves-Foss is a professor within the computer science department at the University of Idaho. In 2000 he teamed up with the NSA to work on the Multiple Independent Levels of Security architecture, a system that has been largely accepted by the entirety of the defense contractor community. He was also a founding member of the Center for Secure and Dependable Systems, and the team captain of the two-person self-funded team “CSDS” that qualified for the finals in the DARPA Cyber Grand Challenge, demonstrating excellence in automated software vulnerability analysis and protection. His team placed 2nd in the qualifying event in June 2015 and moves on to the first ever fully-automated cyber security capture the flag competition in Aug 2016 at DEFCON.

Kamyar Dezhgosha - University of Illinois at Springfield

Kamyard Dezhgosha is a professor of computer science at the University of Illinois at Springfield, where he began working in 2002. He has supervised over 55 master projects, leading to five conference papers and two CSC Outstanding Masters Project selections over the past five years. His research interests include distributed computing, semantic web, and internet computing.

Sviatoslav Braynov - University of Illinois at Springfield

Sviatoslav Braynov is an assistant professor of computer science at the University of Illinois at Springfield, where he has been employed since 2004. He has served as co-chair and a program committee member of more than 40 international conferences and workshops, and has published more than 40 papers and refereed conferences and journals.

Daniel Boley - University of Minnesota

Daniel Boley is a professor of computer science at the University of Minnesota, as well as the director of graduate studies for the master of science program in data science. He has led a significant number of research projects, including Scalable Methods in Machine Learning and Unsupervised Document Set Exploration Using Divisive Partitioning.

John V. Carlis - University of Minnesota

John V. Carlis is a professor of computer science and engineering, the director of undergraduate studies and biomedical informatics and computational biology, and the associate director of graduate studies at the University of Minnesota. He is the author of Mastering Data Modeling: A User Driven Approach, as well as numerous other peer-reviewed publications.

Leonard Adleman - University of Southern California

Leonard Adleman is the Henry Salvatori Professor of Computer Science and professor of molecular biology at the University of Southern California. He has one patent and a patent pending on “molecular computation,” and has received a number of awards, including the IEEE Kobayashi Award for Computers and Communications in 2000.

Michael A. Arbib - University of Southern California

Michael A. Arbib is the Fletcher Jones Professor of Computer Science and University Professor at the University of Southern California, where his research interests include computational and cognitive neuroscience, among others. He has authored and edited nearly 40 books, the most recent of which he edited being Who Needs Emotions? The Brain Meets the Robot.

Methodology

These are not necessarily the only well-regarded and highly skilled educators in the field of computer science. However, these 25 individuals were selected based on specific criteria, which is detailed below:

  • Doctorate degree (or equivalent) – All of the educators on this list have showed commitment to the field of computer science and related studies by obtaining a doctorate degree (or the equivalent).
  • Commitment to outside work – Each one of these professors is associated with various organizations outside of their affiliated universities, and/or is engaged in additional work within the field of computer science. Many of these professors are even performing work that is helping to advance the industry as a whole.
  • Authorship – All of these professors listed above have authored or co-authored, or edited one or more articles, chapters, or even books featured in publications. A few have even received patents for their work.
  • Currently employed at the university – Finally, all of these professors are currently teaching at the university listed next to their name.