How to Become an Engineer - Steps & Requirements by Specialization

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From aqueducts to microchips, automobiles to genetically specific medicines, engineers shape the world we live in and change the common perception of what’s possible. Engineering itself is divided into a variety of sub-disciplines that cover an enormous spectrum of industries and materials. But one thing all forms of engineering share in common is the innovative mindset: taking from one’s surroundings and making them something greater.

For how much the world relies upon them, it should come as no surprise that engineers have some of the highest average salaries in the US, but the demand for some sub-disciplines is much higher than others. Each sub-discipline of engineering follows its career path, with its own set of coursework, licenses, and certification exams. However, there are also some core similarities in the career paths of all engineers.

Read on to learn exactly how to become one of over a dozen different types of engineers, step by step.

Basic Steps to Becoming Any Type of Engineer

After graduating from high school, prospective engineers will need to earn a bachelor’s degree from a school accredited by the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET). ABET employs over 2,200 engineering experts from the public and private sectors to evaluate key factors in an engineering program, and ensure that they’re up to industry standards. In an era of distance learning options, ABET’s stamp of approval is more important than ever.

Admissions requirements for undergraduate engineering programs will vary from school to school, but a competitive GPA (3.0 or greater), strong ACT or SAT scores, letters of recommendation, and personal essays are typically requested. A strong background in math and science is often recommended.

While some schools do offer extremely specific engineering programs as major options (such as water resources engineering or nuclear engineering), it’s more common for prospective engineers to major in a broader engineering discipline, such as civil, electrical, or chemical engineering. These major programs will focus on the fundamentals of a major sector of engineering, and also offer electives that explore the deeper nuances of engineering sub-disciplines.

On top of breadth requirements and major-specific classes, typical core-curriculum courses in these engineering programs will include topics such as calculus, linear algebra, physics, chemistry, and general engineering. This step typically takes four years to complete.

As early as their senior year, prospective engineers may sit for the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam, offered through the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES). The exam may focus on chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical and computer engineering, environmental engineering, industrial and systems engineering, mechanical engineering, or other disciplines. The exam takes approximately six hours to complete.

Once the exam is passed, a candidate earns licensure as an engineer in training (EIT) or an engineering intern (EI). While not a requirement for all types of engineers in all states, it does at the least provide a mark of distinction and prepare engineers for further professional licensure.

After graduating from university and passing their FE exam, an engineer’s career path will be largely determined by the specialization they choose to pursue. But while the order and timeline occasionally vary, the general career trajectory for all engineers usually abides by the following path:

  • Earn a bachelor’s degree from an ABET-accredited university
  • Establish licensure through the NCEES Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam
  • Earn a master’s degree in a sub-discipline of engineering
  • Gain practical experience in the field
  • Earn a professional engineering (PE) license in a sub-discipline of engineering
  • Attain further professional certification and/or join professional societies

While most engineers will follow the above career path, each sub-discipline of engineering has its requirements, coursework, certifications, and professional resources.

Read on to learn exactly what steps are necessary to become a certain type of engineer.

How to Become an Aerospace Engineer

After graduating from an ABET-accredited program, many prospective aerospace engineers pursue a master of science in aerospace engineering (MSAE) degree from an ABET-accredited program. Here they may choose to further specialize in an area such as fluid dynamics, aerospace control, aerospace design, aerospace structures, aerodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, and propulsion.

Coursework may include topics such as fracture mechanics, aeroelasticity, orbital mechanics, statistical theories of turbulence, nonlinear control systems, and the dynamic behavior of materials. Admissions requirements will vary from school to school but may include a competitive GPA (3.0 or greater), GMAT or GRE scores, work experience, letters of recommendation, and a statement of purpose. This step typically takes two years to complete.

After graduating from a master’s program, most aerospace engineers will focus on gaining practical work experience. Four years of such experience, when combined with an ABET-accredited master’s degree and a passed FE exam, will qualify an aerospace engineer to sit for licensure as a professional engineer (PE).

There’s no exam specifically tailored to aerospace engineering, but many opt instead to take the mechanical engineering PE exam, either focusing on thermal and fluid systems or machine design and materials. The nine-hour, 80 question test, once passed, results in a professional engineering license. While not a requirement for aerospace engineers in all states, it does provide a mark of distinction.

Later in their careers, aerospace engineers may join professional societies or organizations related to their field of practice. The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) are two such organizations that offer networking, professional development, and advocacy programs that apply to aerospace engineering.

How to Become an Automotive Engineer

After graduating from an ABET-accredited university, many prospective automotive engineers elect to attend a master’s program in automotive engineering. Admissions requirements vary from school to school but usually include some combination of a competitive GPA (3.0 or greater), work experience, GRE or GMAT scores, letters of recommendation, and a statement of purpose.

Specializations are available in areas like advanced powertrains, advanced vehicle manufacturing, chassis & advanced materials, electrification, intelligent vehicle systems and design, and vehicle performance and control. Core coursework will explore topics such as thermofluid processes, internal combustion engines, automotive body structures, embedded control systems, and hydrogen and fuel cell systems. This step typically takes two years to complete.

After graduating from a master’s program, most aerospace engineers will focus on gaining practical work experience in the field. When combined with ABET-accredited undergraduate and master’s degrees, four years of work experience will qualify an automotive engineer to sit for licensure as a professional engineer (PE).

While there’s no exam specifically tailored to automotive engineering, there are exams for mechanical engineering for machine design and materials, and mechanical engineering for thermal and fluids systems. The test is nine hours long, composed of 80 questions, and, once passed, results in a professional engineering license. While not a requirement for all automotive engineers in all states, it does provide a mark of distinction.

Later in their careers, automotive engineers may join professional societies or organizations related to their field of practice. The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) is a global association of over 128,000 engineers and experts working in the automotive, aerospace, and commercial vehicle industries. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) is a nonprofit focused on providing networking, professional development, and advocacy across several sub-disciplines of mechanical engineering.

How to Become a Biomedical Engineer

After graduating from an ABET-accredited undergraduate program, many prospective biomedical engineers go on to pursue a master’s degree. Admissions requirements vary from school to school but may include some combination of a competitive GPA (3.0 or greater), work experience, GRE or GMAT scores, letters of recommendation, and a personal statement.

Students may focus on areas such as instrumentation, imaging, computational medicine, neuroengineering, or genomics. Typical coursework in biomedical engineering master’s programs covers topics such as advanced systems physiology, computational neuroscience, applied partial differential equations, biomechanics of movement, and fluid mechanics. This step typically takes two years to complete.

After graduating from a master’s program, many biomedical engineers will focus on gaining practical experience in the field. Four years of such experience, when combined with undergraduate and master’s degrees, will qualify one to sit for licensure as a Professional Engineer (PE). Applicants must pass a nine-hour, 80 question exam in biological engineering. While not a requirement for all engineers in all states, the PE license does provide a mark of distinction.

Later in their careers, some biomedical engineers may choose to pursue a Ph.D. in the subject. Admissions requirements and coursework will vary heavily from engineer to engineer and school to school. Such a step is entirely optional. More frequently, biomedical engineers will choose to join professional societies, such as the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES), the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), or the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Bioengineering Division.

How to Become a Chemical Engineer

After graduating from an ABET-accredited undergraduate program, many prospective chemical engineers choose to earn a master’s degree. Admissions requirements vary from school to school but typically include some combination of a competitive GPA (3.0 or greater), GMAT or GRE scores, letters of recommendation, work experience, and a personal statement.

Typical core coursework includes subjects such as thermodynamics, transport phenomena, advances in pollution prevention, polymer science and technology, chemical reaction engineering, and nanoscale engineering. Specialization areas may include topics like thermodynamics, surface science, catalysis, and electrochemical systems. This step typically takes two to four years to complete.

After graduating from a master’s program, many chemical engineers focus on gaining practical experience in their field. Four years of relevant experience, combined with an undergraduate and master’s degree, will qualify one to sit for licensure as a Professional Engineer (PE), which requires applicants to pass a nine-hour, 80-question exam on chemical engineering. While not a requirement for all engineers in all states, the licensure can act, in all cases, as a mark of distinction.

Later in their career, chemical engineers may choose to join a professional society, such as the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), which provides further continuing education, collaboration, and certification options for established experts in the field.

How to Become a Civil Engineer

After graduating from an ABET-accredited university, many civil engineers choose to pursue a master’s degree. Admissions requirements vary from school to school but may include some combination of work experience, a competitive GPA (3.0 or greater), GMAT or GRE scores, letters of recommendation, and a personal statement.

Typical coursework includes structural design, fluid mechanics, civil engineer applications and drafting tools, and solid or hazardous waste management. Further specialization is available in areas such as construction engineering, structural engineering, environmental engineering, power systems engineering, or water systems engineering, and dedicated master’s programs exist for these sub-disciplines as well. This step typically takes two years to complete.

After earning their master’s degree, many civil engineers focus on gaining practical experience in the field. Four years of such experience, when combined with undergraduate and master’s degrees, qualify one to sit for licensure as a professional engineer (PE). Applicants must pass a nine-hour, 80-question exam in their chosen specialization (construction, geotechnical, structural, transportation, or water systems engineering). While not a requirement for all engineers in all states, earning such a license does provide a mark of distinction.

Later in their careers, civil engineers may choose to join a professional society for networking, professional development, and further professional certification related to their specialization. The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) offers professional certifications in coastal engineering, geotechnical engineering, navigation engineering, ocean engineering, ports engineering, and water resources engineering. Eligible candidates for these certifications will need their PE license, a graduate degree, and eight years of relevant work experience.

How to Become a Computer Engineer

After earning an undergraduate degree from an ABET-accredited university, many aspiring computer engineers elect to earn a master’s degree. Admissions requirements vary from school to school but generally include some combination of a competitive GPA (3.0 or greater), work experience, GRE or GMAT scores, letters of recommendation, and a personal statement.

Typical coursework will cover topics such as controls and signals, nanostructures, nonlinear control systems, advanced protocols and network security, and distributed systems and middleware. Specializations include computer science, cybersecurity, data science, and software engineering, each of which may have its own dedicated master’s programs in addition to being a specialization in a generic computer engineering program. This step typically takes two years to complete.

After earning their master’s degree, many computer engineers focus on gaining work experience in their field of specialization. Four years of such experience, when combined with an undergraduate and master’s degree, will qualify a candidate to sit for licensure as a professional engineer (PE). The 9.5-hour, 85-question exam may focus on software engineering or computer engineering. While not a requirement for all engineers in all states, earning the PE license does act as a mark of distinction.

Further vendor certifications, such as those for software development provided by the IEEE Computer Society, may boost one’s credentials further.

Later in their careers, computer engineers may choose to join a professional society, such as the Association of Computer Engineers and Technicians (ACET), which provides support services and networking opportunities for computer engineers, or the International Association of Computer Science and Information Technology (IACSIT), which hosts conferences and journals for working professionals.

How to Become an Electrical Engineer

After graduating from an ABET-accredited university, many aspiring electrical engineers elect to earn a master’s degree. Admissions requirements vary from program to program but often include a combination of work experience, a competitive GPA (3.0 or greater), GMAT or GRE scores, letters of recommendation, and a personal statement.

Students may either pursue a master’s of electrical engineering, a master’s of electrical and computer engineering, or a master’s of nanoengineering. Baseline electrical engineering programs will offer further specializations in areas like electronics, power systems, or nanotechnology. Typical coursework includes subjects such as mixed-signal integrated circuit design, solid-state electronics, microprocessors, and electromagnetics. This step typically takes at least two years to complete.

After earning their master’s degree, many electrical engineers focus on gaining work experience in their field of specialization. Four years of such experience, combined with undergraduate and master’s degrees, will qualify them to sit for licensure as a professional engineer (PE). The 9.5-hour, 85-question exam will focus on either electrical and computer engineering; electronics, controls, and communication; or power systems. While not a requirement for all engineers in all states, licensure does act as a mark of distinction.

Later in their careers, electrical engineers may choose to get involved with professional societies, such as the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), which sets electrical engineering standards, hosts industry conferences, publishes scientific journal articles, and offers both networking and continuing education opportunities.

How to Become an Engineering Manager

After earning a bachelor’s degree from an ABET-accredited university, many aspiring engineering managers choose to pursue a master’s degree. Admissions requirements vary from program to program, but often include a combination of a competitive GPA (3.0 or greater), GMAT or GRE scores, work experience, letters of recommendation, and a personal statement.

Master’s programs may take the form of a master’s in business administration (MBA), technology management (MSTM), or engineering management (MEM or Ms-EM). Engineering management programs will generally focus their coursework on areas like financial management, the economics of engineering, human resources, quality control, and accounting. Technology-focused management programs will have coursework on subjects such as project management, operations management, and health and safety. This step generally takes two years to complete.

After earning their master’s degree, many engineering managers focus on gaining relevant work experience. Four years of such work experience, when combined with undergraduate and graduate degrees, qualifies engineering managers to sit for licensure as a professional engineer (PE). Exams for this license may be taken in any area of engineering specialty. While not a requirement for all engineering managers in all states, licensure does act as a mark of distinction.

Later in their careers, engineering managers may choose to join a professional society and seek further board certification. The American Society for Engineering Management (ASEM), which sets standards for the profession, offers the Engineering Manager Professional Certification (EMPC), in addition to networking and collaboration opportunities for engineering managers.

How to Become an Environmental Engineer

After graduating from an ABET-accredited university, many aspiring environmental engineers elect to earn a master’s degree. Admissions requirements vary from program to program but often include a combination of work experience, an ABET-accredited bachelor of science degree in engineering or a related science, a competitive GPA (3.0 or greater), GMAT or GRE scores, letters of recommendation, and a personal statement.

Concentrations are available in areas such as environmental chemistry, environmental risk management, sustainability, hazardous and solid wastes, air pollution, water resources, and coastal and ecological engineering, among others. Typical coursework includes subjects such as solid and hazardous waste management, microclimatology, element analysis, environmental chemodynamics, water quality management, marine microbial ecology, and operations and processes in sanitary engineering. This step typically takes at least two years to complete.

After earning their master’s degree, many environmental engineers focus on gaining relevant work experience. Four years of such work experience, combined with undergraduate and master’s degrees, qualifies them to sit for licensure as a professional engineer (PE). The qualifying exam consists of 80 questions in environmental engineering, administered in a nine-hour session. While not a requirement for all environmental engineers in all states, licensure does act as a mark of distinction.

Later in their careers, environmental engineers may choose to join a professional society and seek further board certification. The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) board certification is a credential for highly skilled engineers. Because environmental engineering is considered a subfield of civil engineering, the ASCE offers board certification in many concentrations relevant to them. The American Academy of Environmental Engineers & Scientists also offers board certification specifically for environmental engineers. Candidates meeting its requirements can call themselves Board Certified Environmental Engineers (BCEE).

How to Become an Industrial Engineer

After earning a bachelor’s degree from an ABET-accredited university, many aspiring industrial engineers choose to pursue a master’s degree. Admissions requirements typically include some combination of work experience, a competitive (3.0 or greater) GPA, GRE or GMAT scores, letters of recommendation, and a personal statement. Typical coursework covers areas such as warehousing systems, linear optimization, Bayesian statistics, supply chain systems, operations research, and manufacturing systems. This step typically takes two years to complete.

After earning their master’s degree, many industrial engineers focus on gaining relevant work experience in the field. Four such years of experience, when combined with undergraduate and graduate degrees, qualifies them to sit for licensure as a professional engineer (PE), and take the 9.5-hour, 85-question exam in industrial and systems engineering. While not a requirement for all engineers in all states, it acts as a mark of distinction on an industrial engineer’s record.

Later in their careers, industrial engineers may choose to join professional societies or attain further certifications in specialized areas. Numerous certification, networking, and educational options exist through the Institute for Supply Management, the American Production and Inventory Control Society, the Society for Manufacturing Engineers, and the Society for Maintenance and Reliability Professionals.

How to Become a Materials Engineer

After graduating from an ABET-accredited university, many aspiring materials engineers choose to pursue a master’s degree. Admissions requirements vary from school to school, but typically include some combination of a competitive GPA (3.0 or greater), GRE or GMAT scores, letters of recommendation, work experience, and a personal statement.

Concentrations are available in areas such as electronic materials, metals, polymers, structural materials, or general studies. Typical coursework covers areas like advanced materials principles, vector calculus, ordinary differential equations, thermodynamics, polymer physical science, and diffusion, kinetics, and transport. This step typically takes two years to complete.

After earning their master’s degree, many materials engineers focus on gaining relevant work experience. Four years of such work experience, combined with undergraduate and master’s degrees, qualifies them to sit for licensure as a professional engineer (PE). The qualifying exam consists of 80 questions in metallurgical and materials engineering, administered in an eight-hour session. While not a requirement for all materials engineers in all states, licensure does act as a mark of distinction.

Later in their careers, materials engineers may join a professional society. The American Society for Metals (ASM) offers certification in various areas of materials engineering, as well as opportunities for advocacy, networking, and continuing education.

How to Become a Mechanical Engineer

After earning a bachelor’s degree from an ABET-accredited university, many prospective mechanical engineers elect to pursue a master’s degree (MSME). Admissions requirements vary from school to school, but typically include a combination of work experience, competitive GPA (3.0 or greater), GMAT or GRE scores, letters of recommendation, and a personal statement.

Areas of concentration include general studies, energy conversion, manufacturing and materials processing, robotics, thermofluids, or dynamics and control. Typical coursework covers areas such as engineering fluid dynamics, principles of combustion, multiphase flows, energy and propulsion, and convective processes. This step typically takes two years to complete.

After earning their master’s degree, many mechanical engineers focus on gaining practical experience in their field of specialization. With four years of such experience, and in combination with their undergraduate and master’s degrees, mechanical engineers may sit for licensure as a professional engineer (PE). They will be required to pass a nine-hour, 80-question exam in either HVAC and refrigeration, machine design and materials, or thermal and fluids systems. While not a requirement for all mechanical engineers in all states, licensure does act as a mark of distinction.

Later in their careers, some mechanical engineers decide to pursue a Ph.D. to delve deeply into the research aspects of their profession. Admissions requirements and coursework for such programs will vary widely, often tailored to the applicant. This is a completely optional step and often takes between four and five years to complete.

Further certifications, continuing education, and networking opportunities exist in professional societies for mechanical engineers, primarily the American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME). More specialized and industry-specific certifications for mechanical engineers are available from the Association for Facilities Engineering (AFE) and the Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI).

How to Become a Nuclear Engineer

After graduating from an ABET-accredited university, many aspiring nuclear engineers will pursue a master’s degree. Admissions requirements vary from school to school, but often include some combination of a competitive GPA (3.0 or greater), GMAT or GRE scores, work experience, letters of recommendation, and a personal statement.

Specializations and concentrations are available in nuclear science and technology, fission nuclear technology, applied plasma physics, or radiation detection and application. Typical coursework will include subjects such as nuclear fuel management, radiological safety, reactor physics, radiation physics, reactor engineering, and radioactive waste control. This step typically takes two to four years to complete.

After earning their master’s degree, many nuclear engineers focus on gaining practical work experience. Four years of such experience, combined with an undergraduate and master’s degree, will qualify one to sit for licensure as a professional engineer (PE). Candidates must pass an 85-question, 9.5-hour exam. While not a requirement for all nuclear engineers in all states, licensure does act as a mark of distinction.

Later in their career, nuclear engineers may pursue further board certification through the American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine (ABSNM). The most common types of advanced certification include the areas of nuclear physics and instrumentation, radiopharmaceutical science, radiation protection, and molecular imaging. These certifications solidify a nuclear engineer as an expert in their particular niche of nuclear engineering.

In addition to the ABSNM, nuclear engineers may choose to join a professional society for networking, continuing education, and advocacy opportunities. Relevant societies include the American Nuclear Society (ANS), the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM), the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO), and the World Nuclear Association (WNA).

How to Become a Robotics Engineer

After earning a bachelor’s degree from an ABET-accredited university, many aspiring robotics engineers choose to pursue a master’s degree. Admissions requirements vary from school to school, but often include some combination of a competitive GPA (3.0 or greater), GMAT or GRE scores, work experience, letters of recommendation, and a personal statement.

Specialization areas may include mechanical and aerospace engineering, systems engineering, electrical engineering, and artificial intelligence. Alternatively, robotics may itself be a concentration of a master’s in mechanical engineering. Typical coursework will explore areas such as robot dynamics, robot control, concepts of systems engineering, project management, computer vision, intelligent sensors, and human-robot interaction. This step typically takes two years to complete.

After earning their master’s degree, many robotics engineers focus on gaining relevant work experience. Four years of such experience, in combination with their master’s and bachelor’s degrees, will qualify them to sit for licensure as a professional engineer (PE). While no PE exam is specifically tailored to robotics, candidates may sit for the nine-hour, 80-question mechanical engineering exam in machine design and materials. While not a requirement for all robotics engineers in all states, professional licensure does act as a mark of distinction.

Later in their careers, many robotics engineers choose to join a professional society, such as the IEEE’s Robotics and Automation Society, which offers continuing education, conferences, workshops, competitions, and scientific publications. Further professional resources include the ASME’s robotics department and the International Federation of Robotics (IFR).

How to Become a Safety Engineer

After graduating from an ABET-accredited university, many prospective safety engineers choose to pursue a master’s degree. Admissions requirements vary from school to school, but typically include some combination of work experience, a competitive GPA (3.0 or greater), GMAT or GRE scores, letters of recommendation, and a personal statement.

Students may pursue either a master’s in occupational safety or safety engineering. Typical coursework covers topics such as hazard analysis and waste elimination, risk assessment, policy issues in prevention, human performance, crisis leadership, electrical systems safety, and safety-critical design. This step typically takes two years to complete.

After earning a master’s degree, many safety engineers choose to focus on gaining relevant work experience. After four years of such work experience, they are eligible to sit for licensure as a professional engineer (PE). However, there is no direct exam for safety engineers available through the NCEES. A safety engineer may choose to be licensed in a particular area of focus, or they may sit for certification through the Board of Certified Safety Professionals (BCSP) as a Certified Safety Professional (CSP). While not a requirement for all engineers in all states, certification and/or licensure does act as a mark of professional distinction.

Later in their careers, safety engineers may choose to join a professional society, such as the American Society of Safety Professionals (ASSP), which also offers certification options, or the IEEE’s Product Safety Engineering Society (PSEP). Both societies are hubs for networking, continuing education, and advocacy opportunities amongst fellow safety professionals.

How to Become a Systems Engineer

After earning their bachelor’s degree from an ABET-accredited university, many aspiring systems engineers choose to pursue a master’s degree. Admissions requirements vary from school to school, but typically include some combination of a competitive GPA (3.0 or greater), GMAT or GRE scores, work experience, letters of recommendation, and a statement of purpose.

Typical coursework will include classes in areas such as system architecting, design optimization, decision support systems, computer programming for engineers, and digital simulation techniques. Subspecialties exist in topics like biomedical systems, human systems, cybersecurity, software systems, simulation systems, and project management. This step typically takes two years to complete.

After earning their master’s degree, most systems engineers focus on gaining relevant work experience. Four years of work experience, in combination with their undergraduate and master’s degrees, will qualify them to sit for licensure as a professional engineer (PE). To be licensed, they must pass a 9.5-hour, 85-question exam on industrial and systems engineering. While not a requirement for all engineers in all states, professional licensure does provide a mark of distinction and leads to wider career opportunities.

Some systems engineers may then opt to pursue a doctoral degree, however, this is a completely optional step, and one reserved for systems engineers who are interested in the research side of their profession. Admissions requirements and coursework will be highly individualized, with doctoral programs often revolving around the development and defense of a dissertation.

Later in their careers, systems engineers may choose to join a professional society, such as the Institute of Industrial and System Engineers (IISE), which provides networking, continuing education, and advocacy opportunities. The International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) offers many of these resources, as well as further certification as a systems engineering professional. More specialized certifications are available through the Association for Facilities Engineering (AFE) and the North American Transportation Management Institute (NATMI).

Further Resources for Aspiring Engineers

If you’re looking for even more detailed career paths for specific engineering disciplines, check out some of the resources below, which walk you through, step by step:

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